What period was called the Dark Age of Greece?

What is the Dark Age in ancient Greece?

The Greek Dark Age is the interval between the collapse of the Mycenaean civilization, around 1200 BCE, and the Greek Archaic Period, around c. 800 BCE.

What were the Dark Ages in Greece and what characterized them?

What do we mean by Dark Ages ? The Greek Dark Ages were characterized by a gradual, though severe, decline in material culture. Mycenaean pottery styles were gradually replaced by proto-Geometric ware, cremation supplanted burial, and the appearance of long pins and spectacle-fibula suggest a new style of dress.

When was the Greek Dark Age quizlet?

The interval between the collapse of the Mycenaean civilization, around 1200 BCE, and the Greek Archaic Period, around c. 800 BCE.

Who invaded Greece during the Dark Ages?

The Archaic Period. The Archaic period of Greek history lasted from the 8 th century BCE to the second Persian invasion of Greece in 480 BCE. The period began with a massive increase in the Greek population and a structural revolution that established the Greek city-states, or polis .

When was the Greek Archaic period?

The term Ancient, or Archaic, Greece refers to the years 700-480 B.C., not the Classical Age (480-323 B.C.) known for its art, architecture and philosophy. Archaic Greece saw advances in art, poetry and technology, but is known as the age in which the polis, or city-state, was invented.

IT IS INTERESTING:  Is Jorge a Greek name?

What changes occurred in Greece during the Dark Ages?

During the Dark Age, Greeks from the mainland moved to the islands and Asia Minor, agriculture, trade, and economic activity revived, writing systems improved, and Homer wrote the Iliad and the Odyssey.

What is the timeline for ancient Greece?

Greece Timeline

8000 BCE
End of Mycenaean civilization Lefkandi: Toumba building 1000 BCE
900 BCE
First Olympic Games 776 BCE
Greek colonies established in Southern Italy & Sicily Invention of Greek alphabet Homeric poems recorded in writing (750-700) 750 BCE