What were citizens allowed to do in Athens non citizens?

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What rights did non-citizens have in Athens?

While having no citizen rights, of which Athenians were very jealous, they did have access to the courts; but they were unable to own property, so were always lodgers, had to serve in the military, pay a metic tax and, if they became wealthy, were liable for taxes on the rich.

What were citizens allowed to do in Athens?

All Athenian citizens had the right to vote in the Assembly, debate, own land and own slaves. All Athenian citizens were expected to have military training, be educated, pay their taxes and serve Athens in times of war.

What rights did non-citizens have in ancient Greece?

They received some legal protection, but they did not enjoy full citizen rights, such as voting and owning land. Metics had occupations that were thought to be un-Athenian, like trade and commerce.

How were foreigners treated in Athens?

In Athens, where they were most numerous, they occupied an intermediate position between visiting foreigners and citizens, having both privileges and duties. They were a recognized part of the community and specially protected by law, although subject to restrictions on marriage and property ownership.

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What are 3 differences between citizens of Athens and non-citizens?

The Athenian definition of “citizens” was also different from modern-day citizens: only free men were considered citizens in Athens. Women, children, and slaves were not considered citizens and therefore could not vote. Each year 500 names were chosen from all the citizens of ancient Athens.

Who were non-citizens in Athens?

Not everyone in Athens was considered a citizen. Only free, adult men enjoyed the rights and responsibility of citizenship. Only about 20 percent of the population of Athens were citizens. Women were not citizens and therefore could not vote or have any say in the political process.

How were citizens involved in the government of Athens?

How were citizens involved in government in Athens? They participated in the assembly, on juries, and held public offices. … In direct democracy, each citizen participates directly in government. In representative democracy, elected official represent citizens in government and make and vote on laws.

Which group allowed citizenship in Athens quizlet?

Only male citizens could participate in voting and governing the city. A young man became a citizen after he finished his military service at age 20.

Who were citizens of ancient Athens quizlet?

Who was considered a citizen in Ancient Greece? Men over the age of 18 with Athenian parents who owned land. Women, children, slaves, and metics (foreigners) were not considered citizens.

How did Sparta and Athens treat non-citizens?

Sparta: In Sparta non-citizens were women, slaves (called the helots), and Perioikoi (free men, usually foreigners). … Because the helots outnumbered the Spartans 20 to one, the Spartans feared the helots would revolt against them one day. Because of this, the Spartans treated the helots harshly.

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Can metics become citizens?

As citizenship was a matter of inheritance and not of place of birth, a metic could be either an immigrant or the descendant of one. Regardless of how many generations of the family had lived in the city, metics did not become citizens unless the city chose to bestow citizenship on them as a gift.

Did Athens accept outsiders?

Athens also welcomed foreigners themselves. They lived in profoundly insecure times, but rather than walling themselves off from the outside world like the Spartans, the Athenians allowed outsiders to roam the city freely even during wartime, often to the city’s benefit.

Why did Metics not have the full rights of citizens?

Metics Weren’t Given the Rights of Citizens

Among these disadvantages was that they had to pay a military duty as well as additional taxes called “eisphora” and, if they were wealthy, contributing to special civil projects such as helping other wealthy Athenians pay for a warship.