Your question: What kind of crops did the ancient Greeks grow?

What kind of crops did the Greeks learn to grow?

Wheat, barley, olives, and grapes were four of the top crops of ancient Greece. However, they grew a variety of fruits and vegetables, too. Pears, figs, apples, and pomegranates were planted at their homes along with vegetables. The most widespread vegetables were cucumbers, lettuce, garlic, and onions.

What was the vegetation like in ancient Greece?

At least half the land was natural vegetation, consisting as today of dwarf, maquis (shrubs), savannah (scattered trees), or woodland. The first three were valuable pasture‐land. Woodland of oak, pine, fir, beech (in the north), and cypress (in Crete) was mainly in the uncultivable mountains.

What is ancient Greece geography?

Ancient Greece had the Mediterranean Sea to the south, the Ionian Sea to the west, and the Aegean Sea to the east. Greece is actually a series of islands or archipelagos and peninsulas. These islands and peninsulas were covered with high mountains, making travel by land very difficult.

What vegetables grow in Greece?

The basic grain in Greece is wheat, though barley is also grown. Important vegetables include tomato, aubergine (eggplant), potato, green beans, okra, green peppers (capsicum), and onions.

What were 3 main crops grown on Southern plantations?

The cash crops of the southern colonies included cotton, tobacco, rice, and indigo (a plant that was used to create blue dye). In Virginia and Maryland, the main cash crop was tobacco. In South Carolina and Georgia, the main cash crops were indigo and rice.

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What made farming in ancient Greece especially difficult?

What made farming in ancient Greece especially difficult? Land was hard and rocky. They would have to work around the mountains. Suppose an advisor told a farmer, “You could grow more crops by using irrigation.” What would the farmer most likely reply?

What type of soil was in most of ancient Greece?

These soft sediments of ancient Thessaly, Elis and Messenia weathered to grassland (Xerolls) and cracking-clay soils (Xererts), and remain the principal agricultural resource of Greece.