How are decisions made in ancient Greece?

How did ancient Greece make decisions?

A Greek state was the community of its citizens, and at any rate the most important decisions were made by an assembly of the citizens. … Larger organizations often entrusted decisions to a representative council.

How were decisions made in ancient Athens?

Greek democracy created at Athens was direct, rather than representative: any adult male citizen over the age of 20 could take part, and it was a duty to do so. The officials of the democracy were in part elected by the Assembly and in large part chosen by lottery in a process called sortition.

How was ancient Greece governed?

The four most common systems of Greek government were: Democracy – rule by the people (male citizens). Monarchy – rule by an individual who had inherited his role. … Tyranny – rule by an individual who had seized power by unconstitutional means.

How were major decisions made by the Spartan government in ancient Greece?

From the 5th century they had an executive role of their Assembly decision and could call a meeting and the gerousia and made suggestions. They had the right to make the final decision if the two kings could not agree.

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Who made decisions in a time of war in Athens?

At the meetings, the ekklesia made decisions about war and foreign policy, wrote and revised laws and approved or condemned the conduct of public officials. (Ostracism, in which a citizen could be expelled from the Athenian city-state for 10 years, was among the powers of the ekklesia.)

Was there slavery in ancient Greece?

Servitude was widespread in Greek antiquity. Athens alone was home to an estimated 60,000–80,000 slaves during the fifth and fourth centuries BC, with each household having an average of three or four enslaved people attached to it. Athenian slaves tended to enjoy more freedom than those elsewhere.

How did someone become enrolled as a citizen in Athens?

Someone became enrolled as a citizen in Athens by both parents being a citizen who have to be eighteen and yourself has to be male. years from a city by popular vote. The purpose was to get certain people out of the political arena.

How did most kings in ancient Greece come to power?

At first, the Greek kings were chosen by the people of the city-state. When a king died, another leader was selected to take his place. Over time, however, kings demanded that, after their death, their power be passed on to their children—usually to the oldest son.

Who conquered Greece?

Like all civilizations, however, Ancient Greece eventually fell into decline and was conquered by the Romans, a new and rising world power. Years of internal wars weakened the once powerful Greek city-states of Sparta, Athens, Thebes, and Corinth.

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How did the Greek influence our government?

Another important ancient Greek concept that influenced the formation of the United States government was the written constitution. The original U.S. voting system had some similarities with that of Athens. In Athens, every citizen could speak his mind and vote at a large assembly that met to create laws.

Who made the most important government decisions in Sparta?

yea… this is my ss study stuff….. yea….. -_-

Question Answer
Who made the most important government decisions in Sparta? The Council of Elders
Sparta used heavy iron bars as money. What conclusion does this suggest? Sparta discouraged trade with other city-states

What made Athens successful?

This rise occurred largely due to its prominent location and control of key trading routes and leadership in the wars against Persia. While other Greek cities held more powerful armies, such as Sparta, Athens’ leadership proved attractive and helped pave the way for its influence.

What made Sparta successful?

Sparta’s entire culture centered on war. A lifelong dedication to military discipline, service, and precision gave this kingdom a strong advantage over other Greek civilizations, allowing Sparta to dominate Greece in the fifth century B.C.